Tag: How To

5 Reasons Your Career Is Stalled and How to Get Unstuck

There are moments in our professional lives that give us those delightful shocks of bliss: landing the job, proposing the winning idea, getting the promotion, being publicly recognized … the list goes on.

Those are the moments that deliver endorphins, that keep us going and growing.

But what happens when you look around one day and realize it’s been a hot minute since you’ve been graced with such a moment? Work has been fine; you’ve heard no complaints. But every day is starting to feel the same.

There are moments in our professional lives that give us delightful shocks of bliss. But what happens when you look around one day and realize it’s been a hot minute since you’ve been graced with such a moment?

What do you do if you realize your career may be stalled? And how can you put yourself back on the path to something more?

Before you assume your best days are behind you and it’s all downhill from here, let’s talk about what might be causing this stall. Then, we can figure out how you might break on through to the other side.

1. It’s time to move sideways, not up

When I first entered the workforce, I remember getting advice from people ahead of me on how to climb that corporate ladder. It was up or out.

But a few years into my career, I stumbled onto the idea of a career lattice. Imagine a shape more like a snowflake than a ladder. It represents the idea that careers could—and in many cases should—move in all directions.

When the time to climb arrives, you'll be carrying more tools in your professional toolbox.

At different seasons in our lives, we may need different things. Sometimes explosive upward growth is it. But sometimes it’s about taking a left or a right and learning new and valuable things, instead. It's about expanding our knowledge before we take the next step up. Then, when the time to climb arrives, we'll be carrying more tools in our professional toolbox.

When I worked full-time in human resources, there were essentially two brands of HR professionals. The specialists managed programs. Think talent management, leadership development, and even company-wide compensation. The generalists partnered with and advised individual business units.

My climb had always been up the specialist ladder. I knew that world was a better fit for me. But I came to a point in my career whee I realized that if I was going to keep climbing, I needed some generalist experience. Spending time advising business leaders would only help me design better programming in the future.

The last move I made in my full-time career was this lateral one. For me, it became the springboard into consulting. I felt rounded out and ready.

This business I run today would be considered a specialist one, but my generalist experience absolutely informs the practicality of the solutions I build for my clients.

So now ask yourself: What’s a move I could take laterally that would round out my portfolio of skills and experience and ready me for the next step up?

2. Your personal brand needs some love

Early in your career, you were known as the hard-working, creative superstar who would roll up their sleeves and solve any challenge. But is this still the narrative that follows you? When’s the last time you checked in on how people are experiencing you?

When I spoke with personal branding expert Dorie Clark, she talked of the importance of not just crafting but staying vigilant about the state of your personal brand, the way you’re thought of by those around you.

Make sure your colleagues and professional contacts experience you as the person deserving of that next great move. Optics matter.

Have you been doing great work, but finding that the accolades and opportunities for growth don’t seem to be following? Dorie would advise you to consider a personal branding refresh.

Here are some strategies she might suggest:

  • Be a recognized expert. Ask around to find out how people are thinking of you. Are you just a great worker all around, or are you the go-to on something critical? Strive for the latter.
     
  • Recapture your creativity. In the pursuit of doing great work, have you tried anything interesting, or are you just playing it safe? Push yourself out of the box.
     
  • Play more offense. Have you been waiting for the next great move to find you? It might be time for you to let the world know you’re on the hunt.

Make sure your colleagues and professional contacts experience you as the person deserving of that next great move. Optics matter.

3. Your network has stopped working for you

You know what they say: It’s all about who you know. The question here is, have you been paying attention to your network?

Think back to when you started this job. As an ambitious professional, chances are, you leaned into networking around the company like … well, like it was your job. We start new jobs with energy and enthusiasm. We want to learn, drink it in, meet everyone and learn about what they do.

We start new jobs with energy and enthusiasm. And then we start to settle in.

And then we start to settle in. People we reached out to in the early days have forgotten us, or in many cases have moved on themselves.

Having advocates and sponsors at work absolutely matters, people senior to you who will raise your name when they're discussing a big opportunity.

So ask yourself: When is the last time I was intentional about doing some internal outreach?

Start booking those virtual coffees today.

4. It’s time to bulk up your resume

When you finished school and landed the job, you had everything they were looking for.

But time has passed, and you’ve taken on more. Maybe you’ve had a promotion or two along the way.

It’s possible you’ve hit your ceiling. For the qualifications you have, you’re at the top of your game. So, it may be time to consider adding a qualification.

Amidst the pandemic, I’ve seen friends add coaching certifications, accounting credentials, and advisory licenses to their resumes. I’ve watched people learn coding, web design, and more.

If something about your resume has stopped compelling people, then spruce it up and make them listen!

5. It’s time to move on

Sometimes it’s not you, it’s them.

You’re impressive, you’re hard-working, and you know this company like the back of your hand. Sometimes that last bit about knowing your role and company inside and out is the problem. Companies are looking for fresh blood. They want new perspectives, fresh eyes on old ways of doing things.

Consider all you’ve learned, seen, and achieved at your organization. When you put it all in the blender, what’s the story that emerges?

This isn’t a criticism of you. It just may mean that for the outcome you want, you need to explore options outside of your company.

Maybe it’s your moment to be someone else’s fresh eyes.

Consider all you’ve learned, seen, and achieved at your organization. When you put it all in the blender, what’s the story that emerges?

How will you show up for another organization with exactly the wisdom and perspective they need in the moment?

And there you have it! Don’t let a career stall get you down. Diagnose the problem so you can get busy solving it.

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10 Things to Know About Working in New York

Thinking about working in New York? There are some features of work life in the Big Apple that set it apart from the work culture in other cities. Is it true that if you can make it there you can … Continue reading →

The post 10 Things to Know About Working in New York appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

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Comparative Market Analysis: What is a CMA Report for Real Estate Buyers?

In this article: What’s included in a real estate CMA? Comparative market analysis example How is a CMA different from running your own online comps? How to get a comparative market analysis Is a CMA the same as an appraisal? How can buyers create a home market analysis? A comparative market analysis, commonly abbreviated as […]

The post Comparative Market Analysis: What is a CMA Report for Real Estate Buyers? appeared first on Home Buyers Guide.

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How to spot a walkable neighborhood

Strolling to a cafe for breakfast, walking around the corner to yoga—isn’t that the life? Before you buy or rent, here’s how to suss out whether a neighborhood you’re interested in will let you get out from behind the wheel. See what locals have to say. On every Neighborhood page on Trulia, you’ll find What Locals Say ratings. These […]

The post How to spot a walkable neighborhood appeared first on Trulia's Blog.

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How to Save Money For Your First Home

While saving for your first home can seem overwhelming, there are plenty of tips and helpful hints to help you succeed. Our first-time buyer’s guide has everything you need to get started!

The post How to Save Money For Your First Home appeared first on Homes.com.

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What’s the Fastest Way to Boost My Credit?

Article originally published September 1st, 2016. Updated October 29th, 2018.  It’s a common question around these parts: how do I fix my credit? And, while credit scores do have a lot of nuances, the answer is actually pretty straightforward: pay all your bills by their due dates, keep your debt levels low, add a mix of accounts… Read More

The post What’s the Fastest Way to Boost My Credit? appeared first on Credit.com.

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5 Reasons Why Your Budget Is About More Than Money

The post 5 Reasons Why Your Budget Is About More Than Money appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

It’s true.  Your budget is about more than money.  In fact, money is just one piece of the puzzle when it comes to learning how to create a budget. I’ve helped countless people learn to budget over the years.  The one thing that I hear them say repeatedly is how their budget helped them in … Read More about 5 Reasons Why Your Budget Is About More Than Money

The post 5 Reasons Why Your Budget Is About More Than Money appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

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10 Money Management Tips to Teach Your Kids About Finance

Knowing how to handle finances is one of the most basic and important life skills. When you understand how to handle your money, you can avoid falling into financial problems and risks. So teaching your children about money is a key step in preparing them for adulthood. Teach them values and terms, such as saving, and they will grow to possess good money habits even up to adulthood. Broaden your knowledge of finance and money matters and pass them to your kids by reading up. Read LoanStart blog for financial advice and learn the intricacies of financing and loans and how they can help benefit your current financial situation.

1. Integrate Money Into Daily Life

Get your children involved with money. For example, you can have a young child join you at the grocery store to help with shopping. Ask them to compare prices of similar items and discuss why the items may be different. For older children, you might allow your child to watch or participate when you pay bills. Explain the process to them. Let your child know how much money comes in each month and how much you spend on expenses. Show to them how expenses add up.

Involving your children in household finances will help build their financial knowledge at an early age.

2. Give Your Child an Allowance, But Consider the Frequency and Amount

There are several benefits to giving an allowance. For one thing, when your child has money of their own that they can spend at their discretion, they will be incentivized to learn how to handle it. Once the allowance is gone, your child will have to save up to buy necessary items. You can teach your child to be responsible for money management and living within their means by sticking to the rules. Disperse allowance on a regular schedule, and never extend "credit."

Some financial experts recommend giving out an allowance to be budgeted once a month rather than once a week. This gives the child a longer amount of time on how to manage a given amount of money. Also, the larger the amount of money, the more management skills are to be learned.

3. Model Good Financial Behavior

Your children look up to you, so your decisions with money will set an example. Are you late on your bills? Are you living beyond your means? Get your financial situation in order and be honest with your children. Let them know the reason behind your financial behavior so that you can discuss financial planning and management as a family.

4. Teach Your Children About Choices

Let them know the reason behind your financial behavior and embark on sound financial planning and management as a family.

Make sure your children know that there are more ways to use money beyond just spending it. Teach your child to save, invest, or donate to charity, and explain why these options are worth the effort, even if they do not offer the short-term satisfaction that comes with making a purchase.

5. Provide Extra Income Opportunities

Occasionally, you can offer your child an opportunity to make a small amount of extra income by having them do some chores around the house. This will teach them early on about the value of earning money. You can then help them decide what to do with the extra money they have earned.

6. Teach Your Child How to be a Wise Consumer

Before your child buys something new, discuss with them the alternative ways of spending money to emphasize the value of making choices. Teach them to compare shops and items for prices and quality. Show them how advertisers persuade people to buy their products. Encourage your kids to be savvy and critical of ads and commercials.

7. Teach Your Child a Healthy Attitude Towards Credit 

Teach your child how to handle credit. When you think they are old enough to understand what credit is, allow them to borrow an extra amount of money from you to make a major purchase. Talk to them and negotiate how much amount your child will pay you each week from their weekly allowance, and then collect the money and keep track of the remaining balance each week until the debt is repaid.

8. Involve Your Child in Family Financial Planning

Let your child see how you plan your budget, pay bills, how you shop carefully, and how you plan major expenditures and vacations. Explain to them that there are affordable choices, and allow the kids to participate in the decision-making process. You can set a family goal that everyone can work towards.

Explain to your kids that there are affordable choices, and allow them to participate in the decision-making process.

9. Avoid Impulse Buys

Children are prone to impulse buys when they find something cute or eye-catching. Instead of giving in and buying the item for them, let your child know that they can use their savings to pay for the item. However, encourage your child to wait at least a day before they purchase anything above a given benchmark–for example, 15 dollars. The item will still be there the next day and they will have properly decided with a level head if they still want the item.  

10. Get Them Saving for College

College is an important phase that can affect the future of your child. There’s no time like the present to have your teen saving for college. If they plan on working a summer job you can take a portion of that amount and put it on a college savings account. Your child will feel more responsible since their future is at stake with how much they save.

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